Communication and Learning Styles Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet?

Communication is hard! However, this cheat sheet can make it easier. This sheet covers learning styles, languages of apology and love, communication styles, and few little tidbits to help you through communication challenges.


Gary Chapman’s Five Languages of Love Communication

  1. Words of Affirmation: “I think you are beautiful”
  2. Quality Time: Date night rituals
  3. Receiving Gifts: Thoughtful purchases
  4. Acts of Service: “I am making dinner for you tonight baby”
  5. Physical Touch: Hugs, cuddles, and massages

Gary Chapman’s Five Languages of Apology

  1. Express Regret: “I am sorry”
  2. Accept Responsibility: “I was wrong”
  3. Make Restitution: “How can I repair with you”
  4. Genuine Repenting: “I will be more mindful not to do this”
  5. Request Forgiveness: “Please forgive me”

Nonverbal communication Styles

  • Rate and volume of speech
  • The form in which we articulate our words
  • Rhythm and stress placed on certain words
  • Facial expression
  • The amount of eye contact we make
  • Gestures/touch
  • Body language and posturing
  • Tone of voice
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Meeting Interaction Styles

  1. People Oriented Style: Focus on preserving relationships and need reassurance, understanding, and avoid conflict.
  2. Action Oriented Style: These fixers need to focus on collaborating on solutions and detest lectures.
  3. Content Oriented Style: These fine detailed and often linear thinkers, focus on the fine details of the meeting.
  4. Time Oriented Style: Timelines are a priority for their communication needs.

Learning Styles

  1. Visual (spatial): Prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding.
  2. Aural (auditory-musical): Prefer using sound and music.
  3. Verbal (linguistic): Prefer using words, both in speech and writing.
  4. Physical (kinesthetic): Prefer using your body, hands and sense of touch.
  5. Collaborative: Prefer working in a team to learn a new topic Together We Create Harmony www.harmonyusinc.com

Communication styles

  1. PASSIVE COMMUNICATION is a style where individuals have developed a pattern of avoiding expressing their opinions or feelings, protecting their rights, and identifying and meeting their needs.
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Solution

  • Stay present
  • Follow the dreams within conflict model and be open to understanding
  • Ask for clarifying questions and validate that their needs are important to you

2. AGGRESSIVE COMMUNICATION is a style in which individuals express their feelings and opinions and advocate for their needs in a way that violates the rights of others.

Solution

  • This is abusive behavior and not tolerated
  • Self-soothe and end the discussion immediately

3. PASSIVE-AGGRESSIVE COMMUNICATION is a style in which individuals appear passive on the surface but are really acting out anger in a subtle, indirect, or behind-the-scenes way. These happen in the form of snide peanut gallery style comments or indirect communication.

Solution

  • Do not take the bait for conflict and recognize that it is a Gottman dreams within conflict situation
  • Stay present
  • Follow the dreams within conflict model and be open to understanding

4. ASSERTIVE a.k.a DIRECT COMMUNICATION is a style in which individuals clearly relay their thoughts, opinions, and feelings, and firmly advocate for their rights and needs without violating the rights of others.

Solution

  • Ask others to reflect what they heard and ask them to explain what they felt you meant
  • Use soft start up tools
  • Avoid using criticism and contempt in your

5. INFERENTIAL COMMUNICATION of is a style which proposes that communication consists communicators making inferences or assumptions about what the other is thinking or intending based on evidence provided in context. Inferences are essentially deductions or informed estimates.

Solution

  • Use reflective skills and asking clarification questions
  • Recognize the various types of communication intentions thus ask for clarification on what
  • their intentions are with the dialogue
  • Encourage the speaker to use a single statement to express their need
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6. BIG PICTURE communicators and learning styles need an understanding of need a large overview of the subject. Translation Solution

Solution

  • Charts
  • Pictures
  • Reduce the relaying of irrelevant details unless asked for
  • Colors
  • Use reflective skills and asking clarification questions
  • Use metaphors and infographics

7. FINE DETAIL communication and learning style needs to know every connection, detail, and link in the subject.

Solution

  • Charts
  • Pictures
  • Reduce the relaying of irrelevant details unless asked for
  • Colors
  • Use reflective skills and asking clarification questions
  • Use metaphors and infographics

8. TANGENTIAL communicators are chaos Muppets who bounce from topic to topic without missing a beat or completion of a single task at hand. These individuals need to be directed back on task often in the meeting.

9. LINEAR communicators need to stay on task until it is complete in order to be effective in their roles.


Communication Cliff Notes

  • Listen First Communication is a two-way process; getting your message across depends on understanding the other person.
  • Be Interested in the people you are communicating with. Remember people are more attracted to those who are interested in them, and will pay more attention to what they are saying.
  • Be Relaxed Bad body language such as hunched shoulders, fidgeting, toe-tapping or hair-twiddling all gives the game away.
  • Smile and use eye contact. It’s the most positive signal you can give.
  • Ask Questions It’s a great way to show people that you are really interested in them.
  • Be Curious If the other person has a different point of view to you find out more about why they have that point of view. The more you understand the reasons behind their thinking the more you can understand their point of view or help them to better understand your point of view.
  • Be Assertive By this we mean try to value their input as much as your own. Don’t be pushy and don’t be a pushover. Try for the right balance.
  • Be Mindful of Non-Verbal Messages When you are speaking try to be enthusiastic when appropriate. Use your voice and body language to emphasis this.
  • Ask for Clarification Don’t immediately try to latch onto something someone has just said … “oh yes that happened to me” and then immediately go on and tell your story. Make sure you ask enough questions of them first and be careful when / if you give your story so as not just to sound like it’s a competition.
  • Learn from Mistakes If you had a really good conversation with someone try and think why it went well and remember the key points for next time. If it didn’t go so well – again try and learn something from it.
  • Communication of Emotions…
    • 55% is non-verbal
    • 38% is the tone of voice
    • 7% is dependent on the content
  • When Sharing Feelings…
    • Be in a good frame of mind
    • Tune into how the other person responds
    • Set a positive tone to the discussion
    • Check out any feelings of discomfort
    • Do not be hangry or tired
  • Before You React…
    • Know the boundaries of the relationships
    • Check out expectations
    • Review your perceptions
    • Review the other person’s perceptions of you
    • Examine interactions
    • Determine the desired outcomes
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Communication-Road-Graphic

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