Cervue a Natural Alternative to Traditional Mental Health Medications

I have seen several clients having terrific results from a new Product called Cervue. Sanus Biotech offers a natural solution to help people dealing with symptoms of low dopamine and serotonin levels. Why? Because too many people are seeking other harmful and addictive solutions rather than reaching for a proven natural solution.

Cerveau was introduced over the last 16 months to doctor’s offices, almost exclusively. We started offering it to the following type of facilities: MD’s (adolescence for ADHD- to reduce or eliminate Adderrall and Ritalin), MD’s using Cerveau to help treat depression, Integrative medicine, Naturopaths, and addiction clinics. We are now ready to launch Cerveau direct to consumer, so that everyone can enjoy the benefits.

Cerveau is an all-natural dopamine and serotonin supplement. Too little dopamine levels can lead to anxiety, stress, depression, and possibly addictive behaviors. This isn’t another supplement throwing ingredients together (caffeine, jellyfish, etc) branding it and trying to make a buck. We have scientific reasons why this combination of amino acids and herbs is one of the best solutions on the market. Cerveau also comes in a chewable tablet (aka Sublingual, but sublingual can only be used for prescription products) So when chewable tablets are taken, peak blood levels of most products administered sublingually are achieved within 10‐15 minutes, which is generally much faster than when those same drugs/supplements are ingested orally. Sublingual absorption is highly efficient.

It’s the combination of ingredients that make Cerveau so amazing! Did you know that 5-HTP is the amino acid precursor for the Serotonin neurotransmitter molecule. 5-HTP will assist in ensuring optimum levels of Serotonin are being produced. DL-Phenylalanine is being used as an enkephalinase inhibitor. The importance of having enkephalins in the brain is to inhibit GABA, which allows for the correct amount of Dopamine to be released in the brain. L-Glutamine is to ensure proper GABA production. GABA regulated dopamine in the synapse. (as Dopamine goes up, GABA goes down and visa vera). L-Tyrosine and DL-Phenylalanine are amino acid precursors for the Dopamine molecule. Without these two ingredients the brain would not produce enough Dopamine. Rhodiola Rosea is a well non herbal ingredient that prevents the breakdown of Dopamine. Vitamin B6 is necessary for the creation of red blood cells and neurotransmitters. Passion Flower, an herb calming herb for anxiety, insomnia, seizures. Scientists believe passionflower works by increasing levels of a chemical called GABA in the brain. N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC), If you struggle with depression or obsessive-compulsive (OCD) behavior, NAC may help. Several large studies have found that NAC relieves symptoms of depression and anxiety, with none of the side effects you get from antidepressants. Mucuna pruriens is a type of adaptogen, healing plants that regulate hormones to help your body better handle stress. Specifically, mucuna pruriens contains high levels of naturally occurring L-dopa, the precursor to dopamine. L-theanine promotes relaxation and facilitates sleep by contributing to a number of changes in the brain. D-ribose can help replenish the metabolic energy needed by all our cells, including those in major organs such as our heart and brain. The result? Increased vitality, along with improved cardiac and neurological function. Phosphatidylserine is a fatty substance called a phospholipid. It covers and protects the cells in your brain and carries messages between them. Phosphatidylserine plays an important role in keeping your mind and memory sharp.

Sam-E, the body uses SAMe to make certain chemicals in the body that play a role in pain, depression, liver disease, and other conditions.

It is the precise combination and dosage combinations that make Cerveau so special. We have seen that by gently introducing these natural ingredients it has a profound effect on most users of Cerveau.

If you are not satisfied with your results within 30 days we will refund your money 100% guaranteed!

Myths About Keto: What’s True & What’s False?

Wouldn’t it be nice to live in a world where the answers to all our health questions were black and white, (“Eat this, and you will feel good; don’t eat this, or you will not feel good”)? Unfortunately, health is not black and white, and often we have to navigate through the grey areas to find the truth.

MYTH #1: A ketogenic diet increases your risk for cardiovascular disease

This myth is centred around the misinformation that saturated fat and cholesterol are the main causes of heart disease. Despite being shown that dietary cholesterol does not raise blood cholesterol1 and saturated fat has little correlation to heart disease,2 there is still a stigma around both. Cardiovascular risk does not boil down to a single biomarker, but rather encompasses a host of factors such as age, sex, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, smoking, blood pressure, glycemic control, and more. Several of these risk factors may be mitigated by lifestyle changes.

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, as opposed to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, often gets a bad rap because the general understanding about cholesterol is that LDL cholesterol is the “bad” cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol is the “good” cholesterol. While this isn’t entirely misleading, what is misleading is referring to these as absolutes. LDL is usually misrepresented as the single factor that determines one’s risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), when in fact there is more to the LDL and CVD risk story much of which is still uncovered. The danger lies with the small, dense LDL particles (as opposed to large, buoyant LDL particles),3 which have been shown to be associated with CVD.4 It is not uncommon to see a rise in total LDL levels when following a ketogenic diet. Recently published results of a one-year study of patients on a well-formulated ketogenic diet showed that the ketogenic diet did not change total LDL particle numbers but rather caused a shift toward an increase in large, buoyant LDL particles and decrease in small, dense LDL particles,5 which is a good thing! With all of this said, there is still a lot that is not fully understood about LDL cholesterol in the context of a ketogenic diet. As previously stated, LDL is not the only biomarker to consider when determining risk for CVD. Working with a keto-savvy physician is recommended when considering a ketogenic diet.

When part of a weight management program including exercise and lifestyle modifications, the ketogenic diet can actually improve other biomarkers of CVD risk, such as weight,6 HDL cholesterol,6 blood pressure,5 blood levels of saturated fat,7 HbA1c,5 inflammation,8 and more! In fact, research has shown that carbohydrate-rich diets pose more of a health risk than ketogenic diets. High-carbohydrate diets have been associated with increases in small, dense LDL particles and reductions in HDL cholesterol along with raised triacylglycerol levels, all of which contribute to increased CVD risk.9

MYTH #2: The human body requires carbohydrates to survive

This one may be hard to wrap your head around considering there are actually some cell types that do have an absolute requirement for glucose and cannot use fats or ketones for fuel, such as red blood cells which lack mitochondria, the organelle required for ketone utilization. Dr. George Cahill, former professor at Harvard Medical School, studied human body fuel metabolism under prolonged starvation, pioneering the understanding of ketones as an alternative fuel source to glucose. His research demonstrated that even after 40 days of fasting, glucose levels in the participants were maintained, despite consuming no food (Figure 1).10 So where does the glucose come from to fuel these cells when carbohydrates are restricted, such as with a ketogenic diet? Once you are keto-adapted (i.e. in a state of sustained nutritional ketosis), there are two primary sources that contribute to glucose maintenance. The first is from amino acids via a process called gluconeogenesis, where certain gluconeogenic amino acids are broken down into glucose. These amino acids can come from the protein consumed or stored in muscles. However, when ketones are circulating in our blood and the brain begins preferentially using ketones for the fuel, glucose requirements are reduced, therefore the need to break down muscle is reduced. This is one way ketones are muscle-sparing. The second source of glucose is from the glycerol backbone of triglycerides. Triglycerides are the storage form of fat and contain one glycerol backbone attached to three fatty acids. When the body breaks down stored fat while in ketosis, the fatty acids are detached from this glycerol molecule to make ketones, and the glycerol molecule can be converted into glucose, accounting for most of the body’s glucose requirements when keto-adapted.

Figure 1: Circulating concentrations of βOHB, glucose, free fatty acids, and acetoacetate in obese but otherwise normal man fasting for 40 days. Adapted from Cahill GF et al. Ketoacids? Good medicine? Transactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association. 2003;114:149-163.

MYTH #3: Nutritional ketosis puts you at risk for ketoacidosis

This is one of the most common myths, and despite being proven wrong time and again, people still want to believe that the ketogenic diet causes ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is a valid concern given that it can be a life-threatening event where ketone bodies cause a dangerous imbalance in blood pH. However, this condition occurs primarily in those with type-1 diabetes or insulin-dependent type-2 diabetes, and is uncommon in healthy individuals with a fully functioning pancreas. Blood ketone levels are regulated by insulin, just as blood glucose is. When ketones reach their upper limit (~7-8mmol/L), a small amount of insulin is released from the pancreas to help prevent any further elevation in blood ketones, this system is designed to help the body avoid what is considered ketoacidosis (~15-25mmol/L). Nutritional ketosis (i.e. ketosis achieved via a ketogenic diet) is highly unlikely to put a healthy person at risk of reaching dangerous ketone levels. There are rare exceptions to this where ketoacidosis can occur in those adhering to a ketogenic diet in instances such as dehydration, sickness, and possibly pregnancy. However, it is always advised to start a diet and/or weight management program under the supervision of a physician or healthcare provider.

MYTH #4: You can’t do keto as a vegan or vegetarian

The ketogenic diet is commonly associated with a diet primarily composed of animal fats. However, nowhere is it stated that to follow a ketogenic diet, solely animal fats are required. There are plenty of plant-based fat sources that are highly suitable for a ketogenic diet such as avocados, nuts and seeds, olives, etc., and their oil derivatives. For those people who are vegetarian (but not vegan), the options extend even further to include eggs and dairy, both excellent sources of fats. Incorporating oils will likely be necessary for those following a completely plant-based ketogenic diet, as it would be very difficult to fulfil the macronutrient ratios needed to enter ketosis by utilizing only whole foods. This recent post outlines different types of dietary fats that may be used on ketogenic diet, as many of the sources mentioned in the post are plant-based. There are many low-carbohydrate vegetables that should also be included in a ketogenic diet regardless of whether animal products are part of dietary intake. These primarily include leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, lettuces, celery, cucumber, and zucchini. There are also many dairy-free alternatives to dairy fats such as nut milks, full-fat coconut milk, nut-based yogurts, and nut-based cheeses, all unsweetened of course!

MYTH #5: The ketogenic diet is the same as a low-carb diet

Many people begin their ketogenic diet by cutting out carbohydrates and replacing those calories with protein-based foods. Those who are used to restricting dietary fats may approach a ketogenic diet and foods with hesitation. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, moderate-protein, very low-carbohydrate diet. So, while you may be under the allotted daily grams of carbohydrates, the amount of fats and proteins consumed must be considered as well. Fats contain ~9 calories per gram, while protein and carbohydrates contain ~4 calories per gram. Given this information, portion sizes will likely be reduced when following a ketogenic diet, and this may be more of a psychological barrier than a satiety one. Adding additional fats to meals in the form of oil, butter, ghee, or full-fat dairy can transform a low-carbohydrate meal into a ketogenic meal. Consider adding quality fats to protein sources to slow the digestion of protein and attenuate any glucose/insulin responses that could potentially prevent one from “entering” or “kicking out” out of ketosis. If you are not entering ketosis following what you believe to be a ketogenic diet, void of almost all carbohydrates, you may be overconsuming protein. In this case, adjust your macronutrients to include higher quantities of dietary fats and less low-fat protein sources.

 

Resources:

  1. Kratz M. Dietary cholesterol, atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Handb Exp Pharmacol, 2005(170):195-213.
  2. Siri-Tarino PW et al. Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(3):535-546.
  3. Steinberg D. Low density lipoprotein oxidation and its pathobiological significance. J Biol Chem. 1997;272:20963–20966.
  4. Hoogeveen RC et al. Small Dense LDL Cholesterol Concentrations Predict Risk for Coronary Heart Disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology. 2014;34(5):1069-1077.
  5. Bhanpuri NH et al. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Responses to a Type 2 Diabetes Care Model Including Nutritional Ketosis Induced by Sustained Carbohydrate Restriction at One Year: An Open Label, Non-Randomized, Controlled Study. Cardiovascular Diabetology. 2018;17:56.
  6. Hallberg SJ et al. Effectiveness and Safety of a Novel Care Model for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes at One Year: An Open Label, Non-Randomized, Controlled Study. Diabetes Therapy. 2018.
  7. Forsythe CE et al. Limited effect of dietary saturated fat on plasma saturated fat in the context of a low carbohydrate diet. Lipids. 2010;45:947-962.
  8. Youm Y-H et al. Ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate blocks the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease. Nature medicine. 2015;21(3):263-269.
  9. Taubes G. Nutrition: the soft science of dietary fat. Science. 2001;291:2536–2545.
  10. Cahill GF Jr. Starvation in man. New Eng J Med. 1970;282:668-675.

Submitted by the Metagenics Marketing Team

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Personalizing Nutrition for an Active Lifestyle

By Daniel Heller, MSc, CSCS, RSCC

In the summer 2018, while exploring the Sequoia National Forest in California on mountain bikes, my friends and I experienced “hitting a wall” or a sudden lack of energy, where we felt like we couldn’t go any further. The physical symptoms we shared were different, but most could be linked back to our diets: weakness, nausea, headaches, cramps, and dizziness. Avoiding, or eliminating, these unwanted symptoms all comes down to making the right choices before, during, and after embarking on physical activities.

Fine-tuning one’s diet assumes the current diet is already diverse and complete with a variety of color, different types of proteins (plant and/or animal based), carbohydrates from whole grains, vegetables and fruits, and healthy fats. Now one could ask the question: “Am I consuming the right amounts of the correct foods to meet the demands of my activity?” This type of nutrition- and activity-focused thinking is called “activity-specific nutrition.” It encompasses the type, duration, intensity, and environment of the physical activity about to be embarked upon. Each of the factors that make up activity-specific nutrition play a role in determining what kind of sustenance our bodies need to prepare, sustain, and recover from the activity we intend to undertake.

Carbohydrates and proteins are the primary macronutrients utilized in physical activities that can be categorized into endurance and resistance training. For endurance-based activities (cycling, hiking, and running), carbohydrates provide sustained energy.1 It should be noted that current research also suggests that fat can be used as an endurance fuel source.2 For resistance training (weight lifting, circuit training, and manual labor), protein is critical in helping to repair and rebuild muscle.3

In a previous article three principles of strength and conditioning were discussed in detail. Now, we add an additional piece: What are good food choices that will support your favorite activities?

Answers to commonly asked questions can provide insight into more effective ways to fuel your active lifestyle:

Question: What should I eat after I’m done lifting at the gym? I usually train my upper and lower body on separate days. My workouts last about 60-90 minutes. I want to get bigger and stay lean.

Answer: For this type of intense resistance training, it is recommended that intake of 15-25 grams of protein following your workout is best. Choose a protein supplement (powder or bar) or, preferably, eat a complete meal, such as an 8-ounce chicken breast, cup of brown rice, and a vegetable.

Question: I love hiking, and usually my hikes last from 3-6 hours and cover about 8-10 miles. I don’t like eating packaged energy foods (bars and gels). What do you suggest?

Answer: Hiking is a fantastic physical activity; the distance and duration described is endurance at a moderate intensity. If you don’t like packaged nutrition, I suggest you prepare food the night before. I have two main items I make: First is a peanut butter sandwich with fresh berries and honey instead of jam. Second is a trailside preparation of crackers, cheese, and a cured meat. When making your selection, choose the items that have the fewest number of ingredients on the labels. Carbohydrates with a moderate glycemic load will be ideal to help maintain energy throughout your hike.

 

If you’re somewhere in the middle and usually participate in a high-intensity, interval training type of workout, you’ll have to consume enough protein to rebuild muscle and muscle fibers that undergo microtrauma from resistance training and replenish glycogen stores (energy) depleted from aerobic physical exertion.

The reality of caloric expenditure is that it varies based on age, body composition, and physical activity intensity. Many sports watches provide estimated caloric expenditure in real time. This makes it simple to assess under- or overconsumption of food as a whole. The number of calories consumed, and what are burned, needs to be in accordance with physical activity goals. For example, if your goal is to lose weight, you should be at a caloric deficit (eating 200-500 calories below what you’ve burned according to what your watch says). Fitness devices vary in price and features, but basic functions of measuring number of steps walked, calories burned, and heart rate are now commonly available on most of these devices.

There are, of course, caveats to the basic ideas for activity-specific nutrition presented here. For example, if you’re adhering to a ketogenic-style diet, the carbohydrate suggestion will not work. For ketogenic diets and endurance performance, I suggest reading Dr. Silverman’s article on why the keto diet may benefit athletes.

Until next time, live well and live active.

 

References

  1. Jeukendrup A. A Step Towards Personalized Sports Nutrition: Carbohydrate Intake During Exercise. Sports Med. 2014;44(1):25-33.
  2. Volek JS, Noakes T, Phinney SD. Rethinking fat as a fuel for endurance exercise. Euro Jl Sport Sci. 2015;15(1):13-20.
  3. Phillips SM. Defining Optimum Protein Intakes for Athletes. In: The Encyclopaedia of Sports Med. John Wiley & Sons Ltd; 2013:136-146.

 

Daniel Heller, MSc, CSCS, RSCC:

Holistic strength and conditioning coach, Daniel Heller, MSc, CSCS, RSCC earned his Bachelor’s of Science in exercise science and wellness from Bastyr University in 2009 on a direct path to having a positive impact in the world of exercise and sport science. Since graduating from Bastyr, Heller has gone onto coaching youth athletes in ice hockey, figure skating, and mountain biking. As well as developing postural alignment and compression garments with Oakley Inc. and was the primary author of the exercise chapter for the Metagenics FirstLine Therapy Patient Guidebook. In 2016, he received his Master’s of Science degree in Strength and Conditioning from the University of Edinburgh in Edinburgh, Scotland. Heller is continuing to coach and actively participates in the field of strength and conditioning.

Daniel Heller is a paid consultant and guest writer for Metagenics.

 

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Keto Q&A: Practitioner Questions Answered

Occasionally we receive questions from practitioners on certain topics. With the ketogenic diet’s recent rise in popularity, we put together a Q&A with Mark Kaye, DC to answer questions that have arisen.

What effect do coffee and tea have during a ketogenic diet?

Tea, in particular green or similar herbal teas, are the most popular beverages consumed worldwide. Phytonutrient-rich teas contain appreciable amounts of antioxidant phytochemical compounds that the body can use to maintain proper cellular communication and function. One of the most well-known compounds in tea is epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which has shown positive support for a variety of health applications such as support for blood glucose metabolism and mitochondrial energy support (ATP production). Proper cell signaling and mitochondrial energy function are key targets of diet modification through a nutritional ketogenic food program.

While coffee has traditionally been considered a stimulant, current research on the physiological and metabolic impact of coffee focuses on the myriad of phytochemical antioxidants found in moderate consumption of coffee as showing potential health benefit. Caffeine is far from a simple stimulant. Current research affirms caffeine’s impact on focus and attention through support of dopamine modulation in the brain. A recent study (2017) affirmed caffeine intake, equivalent to up to five cups per day of caffeinated tea or several cups of coffee, increased measured ketones in vivo.1

The available literature and scientific data affirms that reasonable, moderate intake of these beverages provides positive health benefit. That is not to say that their abuse or overuse as “thermogenic” aids is desirable. Proper diet of any type, whether Mediterranean, Asian, Paleolithic, or ketogenic, can be healthy or unhealthy depending on how it is implemented. Moderation and variety remain key to any dietary approach, including moderate intake of healthy beverages, with water remaining the main drink of choice, along with healthy fat choices and broad variety of phytonutrients derived from whole foods or phytonutrient-rich supplementation.

For a start, here is a fine recipe for a coffee-based keto shake:

  • 2 scoops keto shake powder
  • 1 tsp. heavy cream
  • 1½ Tbsp. ground flaxseeds
  • 4 oz. coffee (room temperature or cold)

Directions: Mix ingredients together in a blender along with water and ice. Blend until desired consistency and enjoy.

Calories 302
Protein 22 g
Carbohydrate 8 g
Fat  21 g

 

How long can a ketogenic diet be sustained?

The ketogenic dietary plan has been known for perhaps 100 years. Researchers such as Volek and Phinney do advocate long-term use of a “ketogenic lifestyle” and have offered compelling reasons in the literature for its use. Some may not prefer to maintain the ketogenic diet for the long term. For those who desire a dietary program with greater food variety, once they have achieved their health goals through a ketogenic diet plan, they may consider transitioning to a Mediterranean or Asian (Okinawan) dietary plan high in low-starch plant foods, healthy seafood, fruits, berries, and nut and seed oils. For further information on healthy ketogenic dietary choices, please see the Metagenics Blog Quick Start Guide to Ketosis, section “What to Eat for Ketosis.” Consult with your healthcare practitioner before beginning any diet plan.

 

After starting a ketogenic diet and going through adaptation, how do you know you are in ketosis?

Measuring ketones, whether in the blood, urine, or breath, remains highly desirable from an efficacy standpoint—ensuring that one is truly within “nutritional” or physiological ketosis. While a patient may see many improvements in overall feeling of wellbeing and may see positive changes in weight, these measures are more subjective. Measuring is objective.

The most common method remains urine testing. Urine test strips are readily available and test for excreted acetoacetate (a ketone metabolite). Initial urinary ketone testing may be high and decrease as the body becomes more efficient at ketone utilization for energy. The most accurate and graphical measure is blood ketones (primarily beta-hydroxybutyrate), which can demonstrate if one is within the desirable, healthy physiological ketosis range.

 

What recommendations/contraindications can you provide for the use of electrolyte supplementation during the ketogenic diet?

Quality food choices remain important in any diet. Low-starch plant foods (vegetables) are the main consideration for electrolytes such as potassium. Vegetables not only provide valuable vitamins and minerals but also add valuable phytonutrients to the program. Sodium is a key electrolyte. It is understood that many in North America consume excesses of salt; however, maintaining sodium intake is important in the ketogenic food plan. A practitioner should monitor salt intake. For those patients who may benefit from exogenous ketone salts to facilitate transition to ketosis, sodium and calcium bHB salts can assist in electrolyte balance.

 

How long is it safe to stay on a ketogenic diet before transition?

There is no maximum length of time to stay with a ketogenic diet plan. Some may find that the ketogenic food plan is appropriate for extended periods of time—they may adopt a keto lifestyle for the remainder of their lives. For others, a ketogenic eating plan may be too restrictive. For these, transitioning to a Mediterranean-style food plan is often a choice that provides a great variety of healthy, whole-food choices and may be a diet plan easier to comply with. In the latter instance, it is always best to set a few goals to achieve with a ketogenic food plan and, once achieved, transition to the Mediterranean diet and lifestyle plan. As always, consult with your healthcare practitioner before beginning any diet plan.

 

How much protein is allowed for runners on a ketogenic program?

Each athlete will be different as to needed or tolerated protein intake. What is most important in a ketogenic food plan is the macronutrient ratio (70% fat, 20% protein, and 10% carbs). Ketogenic diets are moderate protein-intake programs. It is suggested that the satiety effects of a ketogenic food plan are also naturally calorie-moderating. The emphasis in a ketogenic diet, as with any diet, is on quality proteins both as quality whole food and functional protein supplements. RDA protein intake is approximately 0.8 g/kg of body weight. For athletes, that number is a bit higher: 1.0 to perhaps ~2.0 g/kg of body weight (75-150 g/day for a 75 kg person), which is a number easily obtainable by the athlete.

 

Reference

  1. Vandenberghe et al. Caffeine intake increases plasma ketones: an acute metabolic study in humans. Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2017;95(4):455-458.

 

Mark A. Kaye, DC, Senior Manager, Medical Information, Medical Affairs

Dr. Kaye started with Metagenics in June 1995 and has been leading seminars, speaking internationally, writing, and supporting practitioners through programs including Innovative Practice Solutions (IPS) and FirstLine Therapy (FLT) ever since. Mark manages the Metagenics Medical Information team, providing practitioner support for medical foods, functional foods, and dietary supplements in clinical practice. In addition, Mark supports Metagenics International Distributors in their clinical and product needs and is involved in compliance with U.S. and Canadian dietary supplement regulations.

Dr. Kaye received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from the Los Angeles College of Chiropractic and was in private practice in Southern California for approximately 10 years prior to joining Metagenics. In addition to licensure in California, Dr. Kaye has also been licensed to practice chiropractic in Arizona and Maine.

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The Lowdown on the Ketogenic Diet, Part 1

 

The ketogenic diet is rapidly gaining new followers, so we sat down with Scott Bergman, DC to get the scoop on this popular lifestyle option. This is part two of a series, where we learned about possible issues patients might experience with the ketogenic diet. Patients experiencing extreme symptoms should refer to their healthcare practitioner. Always work with a healthcare practitioner prior to starting a new diet plan.

 

What tips can you provide for minimizing or avoiding the “keto flu”?

Salt. Remember that insulin increases the reabsorption of sodium into the kidneys, and that leads to increased fluid volume. When we have that drastic reduction of carbs with a ketogenic diet, we’ll reduce the insulin, and that drastic reduction of carbs and insulin acts as a diuretic. That causes a pretty aggressive flushing of fluid, and anytime we lose fluid, we’re going to lose electrolytes. Not having enough electrolytes can be a really big problem. That’s an isotonic dehydration. If we replace the water lost without replenishing the salts, we get a hyponatremic dehydration. You can get muscle aches and spasms, twitches, restlessness, sleep issues, and dizziness. So getting in the salt is probably the answer for 95% of all keto flu issues. Partnering with a healthcare practitioner is important to avoid acute hyponatremia and address keto flu, and patients should notify their healthcare practitioner of any unusual, new symptoms.

We can use exogenous ketones; a serving of exogenous ketones usually has about 1,000 milligrams of sodium, which helps right away. I will try to keep the salt conversation with patients at the forefront of our consultations and really encourage somewhere between 4,000 and 5,000 milligrams a day. I also remind patients that it’s okay to have their coffee, but a normal cup of coffee will usually deplete about 500 milligrams of sodium. It doesn’t mean don’t have your coffee; it just means that if you’re going to have coffee or caffeinated tea, that you should add an additional 500 milligrams of salt per serving of beverages causing diuresis. Sometimes patients are afraid of eating the prescribed amount of fat and simply don’t eat enough. Adding calories back into the diet will help reduce the keto flu symptoms as well.

 

With the ketogenic diet’s higher dietary fat intake, are patients more susceptible to GI discomfort? If so, how do you recommend they address this?

It may be possible for some at first. We often blame the fat; research is showing fat gets a bad rap.

If people are having a hard time, I look at their diet diary because they might be doing a lot more MCTs right off the bat. Sometimes taking in a large amount of caprylic acid, you’ll get GI discomfort.

Then I’ll also ask the patient where the discomfort is. If it’s right under the sternum, I think about a digestive issue in the stomach.

If it’s distress below the navel, I’ll think large intestines. If there’s discomfort between the navel and the sternum, I’ll often think small intestines. One of the things that seems to be overlooked a lot when people do switch over to a ketogenic diet is whether the liver or gallbladder is healthy enough to handle the sudden increase in dietary fats.

 

What are other common issues patients might experience while on the ketogenic diet?

Initially there could be some mild fatigue, there could be sugar cravings for sure, the dizziness, a little bit of brain fog. I’ll always recommend reviewing the patient’s diet diary. The easy fixes could be needing to add more fat. Maybe we need to add more calories. Maybe if they’re really struggling, we have to just add a little bit more clean carbs and let the body kind of stair-step into ketosis rather than forcing the ketosis. Definitely exogenous ketones will help. The salt will help as well. Make sure they are hydrated and they are getting at least half their body weight in fluid ounces of water minimum. Exercise will help get people into ketosis as well. But I often have a discussion with people that in the beginning of trying to get into ketosis, there’s no carbs and there’s not enough ketones to fuel the body yet, so we’re often depriving the brain and the body of fuel, so it does take some time to allow the process to happen.

 

About Scott Bergman:

Scott Bergman, DC is a chiropractor, board certified naturopath, and certified Functional Medicine practitioner in Walnut Creek, California. Since 1993 Dr. Bergman has been the director of Chiro Kinetics, an integrative health clinic combining Chiropractic care, rehabilitation, pilates, core yoga therapy, Functional Medicine, and biological resonance. For 25 years, Dr. Bergman has presented edifying health, nutrition and fitness information internationally in business, education, and community settings. Dr. Bergman completed his chiropractic training at Los Angeles College of Chiropractic.

Scott Bergman is a paid consultant and guest writer for Metagenics.

 

 

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Holistic Psychiatry Information

Oriental Medicine

Acupuncture2Oriental Medicine is an ancient medicine that has diagnosed, healed and prevented illness in China for over 3,000 years. It is the pearl of ancient wisdom for your health and well-being and has been able to approach, assist and/or treat many health issues.

The practice of Oriental Medicine includes acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathic remedies, nutritional therapy, Tui Na (a form of therapeutic massage), cupping therapy, Gua Sha (scraping technique), moxibustion (herbal heat therapy), and Qi Gong (a form of breathing therapy). All of these methods share an equally long history of development, usage, and effectiveness in the maintenance of health, and the treatment of disease.

Acupuncture

acupuncture of earAcupuncture involves the use of hair-thin, sterile, single-use needles which are inserted into specific points on the body (legs, arms, abdomen, back, head, and etc.). The purpose of the needles is to help your body harmonize itself. Those who are afraid of needles typically change their mind once they see just how thin acupuncture needles are. However, your acupuncture physician can treat you even without the use of acupuncture needles. Your acupuncture physician may also prescribe herbal medicine, nutritional counseling, use cupping therapy, massage techniques (Tui Na), moxibustion (herbal heat therapy), or a scraping technique (Gua Sha).

MD001310Acupuncture is a highly effective health care system that has been continuously refined over the last 5,000 years and is the oldest continually practiced form of medicine in the world. This gentle, non-invasive medicine has helped millions to get well on a physical, emotional and spiritual level. The National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization both acknowledge the efficacy and effectiveness of Acupuncture for a variety of chronic health conditions. Acupuncture is used as both a preventive medicine, as well as a healing medicine to help you overcome chronic or acute health conditions.

 

How Does It Work?

Acupuncture-Therapy-_-Acupuncture-Moving-Cupping-Demo

Acupuncture and herbal medicine from the foundation of Chinese medicine, which is based on the notion of balance. To the practitioner, health is defined as the balance of yin and yang and the smooth flow of Qi (life force) and blood throughout the body.When yin and yang are out of balance, the organ systems begin to malfunction and sickness results.

Imbalance can result from many factors, including mental and emotional stress, improper diet, environmental factors, physical trauma, genetic predispositions, etc. Our number one priority is helping your body regain its balance. The first step is to conduct a thorough evaluation and determine the root of the imbalance.

 Evaluation and Diagnosis

Each patient is evaluated using four primary tools: observation, listening and smelling, questioning, and palpation. The information gathered with these tools is used to formulate an overall health picture. Examination of the tongue and monitoring of the pulse play a crucial role in diagnosis. The tongue is the mirror of the body, offering clues about the general state of harmony or disharmony in the body based on its color, moisture, size, coating and any abnormalities present.

Contemporary Chinese Pulse Diagnosis is an exquisite and sophisticated means of understanding the whole person and provides insight into your emotional conditions, traumas (emotional and physical), previous illness, constitution, environmental stressors, lifestyle, and behavioral patterns.

Patsy Evans is a Licensed Acupuncture Physician and Doctor of Oriental Medicine and specializes in Emotional Disharmony and Holistic Psychiatry.  Our holistic approach to psychiatric medicine is intended to work as a complimentary treatment to counseling and traditional western psychiatry.

The post Holistic Psychiatry Information appeared first on House of Harmony.

Holistic Psychiatry Information

Oriental Medicine

Acupuncture2Oriental Medicine is an ancient medicine that has diagnosed, healed and prevented illness in China for over 3,000 years. It is the pearl of ancient wisdom for your health and well-being and has been able to approach, assist and/or treat many health issues.

The practice of Oriental Medicine includes acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathic remedies, nutritional therapy, Tui Na (a form of therapeutic massage), cupping therapy, Gua Sha (scraping technique), moxibustion (herbal heat therapy), and Qi Gong (a form of breathing therapy). All of these methods share an equally long history of development, usage, and effectiveness in the maintenance of health, and the treatment of disease.

Acupuncture

acupuncture of earAcupuncture involves the use of hair-thin, sterile, single-use needles which are inserted into specific points on the body (legs, arms, abdomen, back, head, and etc.). The purpose of the needles is to help your body harmonize itself. Those who are afraid of needles typically change their mind once they see just how thin acupuncture needles are. However, your acupuncture physician can treat you even without the use of acupuncture needles. Your acupuncture physician may also prescribe herbal medicine, nutritional counseling, use cupping therapy, massage techniques (Tui Na), moxibustion (herbal heat therapy), or a scraping technique (Gua Sha).

MD001310Acupuncture is a highly effective health care system that has been continuously refined over the last 5,000 years and is the oldest continually practiced form of medicine in the world. This gentle, non-invasive medicine has helped millions to get well on a physical, emotional and spiritual level. The National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization both acknowledge the efficacy and effectiveness of Acupuncture for a variety of chronic health conditions. Acupuncture is used as both a preventive medicine, as well as a healing medicine to help you overcome chronic or acute health conditions.

 

How Does It Work?

Acupuncture-Therapy-_-Acupuncture-Moving-Cupping-Demo

Acupuncture and herbal medicine from the foundation of Chinese medicine, which is based on the notion of balance. To the practitioner, health is defined as the balance of yin and yang and the smooth flow of Qi (life force) and blood throughout the body.When yin and yang are out of balance, the organ systems begin to malfunction and sickness results.

Imbalance can result from many factors, including mental and emotional stress, improper diet, environmental factors, physical trauma, genetic predispositions, etc. Our number one priority is helping your body regain its balance. The first step is to conduct a thorough evaluation and determine the root of the imbalance.

 Evaluation and Diagnosis

Each patient is evaluated using four primary tools: observation, listening and smelling, questioning, and palpation. The information gathered with these tools is used to formulate an overall health picture. Examination of the tongue and monitoring of the pulse play a crucial role in diagnosis. The tongue is the mirror of the body, offering clues about the general state of harmony or disharmony in the body based on its color, moisture, size, coating and any abnormalities present.

Contemporary Chinese Pulse Diagnosis is an exquisite and sophisticated means of understanding the whole person and provides insight into your emotional conditions, traumas (emotional and physical), previous illness, constitution, environmental stressors, lifestyle, and behavioral patterns.

Patsy Evans is a Licensed Acupuncture Physician and Doctor of Oriental Medicine and specializes in Emotional Disharmony and Holistic Psychiatry.  Our holistic approach to psychiatric medicine is intended to work as a complimentary treatment to counseling and traditional western psychiatry.

The post Holistic Psychiatry Information appeared first on House of Harmony.