Alcohol Addiction: Debunking the Myth

Many people have their beliefs about alcohol addiction. However, most of these beliefs stem from a lack of experience, understanding and perhaps tolerance.  So let us correct some of these common misconceptions.

Myth 1: Addiction is only a bad habit and the only reason addicts can’t quit is because they have no willpower.

At the start of drinking, perhaps it could be a voluntary decision. Consider it a much needed respite from work, bills, relationship and all the drama. However, the more they choose to turn to it, the more dependent they become on it to relieve stress and in the end, they become addicted. This addiction happens because alcohol alters the brains and now the alcohol is in control of the addict.

Myth 2: Addicts are people with mental problems.

The statement is untrue. Addicts began as normal people who only started on one or two drinks to relieve stress. The more they seek this as an outlet, the more addicted they become. As we said in myth #1 alcohol alters the brain, creating a need in the user to be drinking all the time. This leads to bad life decisions.

Myth 3:  Treatment never works. Look at how many people relapse

The public thinks, that it will be easy to quit alcohol cold turkey however it is not that easy. The rehabilitation of alcoholics or treatment for them is not a one size fit all. The programme has to be tailored to suit the needs of the alcohol addicts. Different individuals have different issues that they are dealing with and they also respond differently to various treatment.

Myth 4: The addict has to be willing to quit for treatment to be effective.

Most of the time, they do not want treatment. They only seek treatment because they were ordered by the court or they were referred by concerned family members. Wanting to quit has little effect on the effectiveness on the treatment.

Myth 5: Addicts are a lost cause once they relapse.

Getting off the addiction is easy. Staying off it is difficult. Relapsing does not mean hitting rock bottom. It could be used as a positive thing by analyzing why the individual relapsed, what trigger that triggered the event and learn to avoid it next time. These are a few of the myths of alcohol addiction. The knowledge of this alone will help you be a better friend to those in need.

 

Dr. Harmony’s Self Care for Your Mind Tip #4

What is CBD Oil?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a naturally occurring constituent of industrial hemp/cannabis. Its formula is C21H30O2 and it has a molecular mass of 314.4636. It is the most abundant non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in cannabis and is being scientifically investigated for various reasons.CBD oil is a cannabis oil (whether derived from marijuana or industrial hemp, as the word cannabis is the latin genus name for both) that has significant amounts of cannabidiol (CBD) contained within it. Our CBD products and extracts are derived from industrial hemp, so they could be considered CBD-rich hemp oil, hemp derived CBD oil, CBD-rich cannabis oil, or plainly “hemp extracts” since they typically contain much more than just CBD. Again, cannabis doesn’t mean marijuana but is the genus name and general umbrella term which all forms of marijuana and hemp fall under. The form of cannabis we use for our CBD and hemp extracts is industrial hemp; we do not sell marijuana.

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CBD and Mental Health

The Mental Health Blog Reported:

Cannabidiol (CBD) is just one of over 85 scientifically-identified cannabinoids (or chemical compounds) derived from the flowering plant cannabis.  Each of the cannabinoids within cannabis elicits unique neurophysiological effects.  Most people are well-aware of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the predominant cannabinoid within cannabis that is ingested by upwards of 230 million people per year as a psychoactive euphoriant.

Although not as abundant as THC cannabinoid content, cannabidiol accounts for approximately 40% of all cannabinoids within cannabis extract.  Unlike THC, cannabidiol is non-psychoactive and isn’t typically ingested with the intent to attain any sort of psychological euphoria.  That said, the medicinal properties associated with cannabidiol (often administered in the format of “CBD oil”) are thought to far exceed those of THC.

Preliminary evidence suggests that CBD may act as an: anticonvulsant, antipsychotic, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective agent.  Furthermore, some evidence suggests that CBD oil may be an effective intervention for the ongoing management of anxiety disorders.  Those with anxiety disorders who fail to derive benefit from traditional pharmacology and/or who are unable to tolerate standard pharmacological treatments may want to consider administration of CBD oil on an ongoing or “as-needed” basis.

Read More from the Mental Health Blog

SuperNatural Healing CBD monthly box

The CBD products in this subscription box were designed specifically to relieve anxiety and pain. Formulated to help with PTSD and pain from a severe car accident, each product has added herbs and terpenes to enhance the benefits of the 1000 mg of CBD. Choose from the Tincture box, the relaxing Bath Salts box, the healing Salve, or ALL THREE!

What’s the difference between Hemp and Marijuana?

Scientifically, industrial Hemp and Marijuana are the same plants, with a genus and species name of Cannabis Sativa. They have a drastically different genetic profile though. Industrial Hemp is always a strain of Cannabis sativa, while marijuana can be Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, or Cannabis ruderalis. The major difference is how industrial hemp has been bred compared to a marijuana form of Cannabis sativa. Typically speaking, industrial hemp is very fibrous, with long strong stalks, and barely has any flowering buds, while a marijuana strain of Cannabis sativa will be smaller, bushier, and full of flowering buds. However, newer industrial hemp varieties in the USA are being bred to have more flowers and higher yields of cannabinoids and terpenes, such as our Kentucky hemp we’re now using!

99% of the time marijuana has a high amount of THC and only a very low amount of CBD. Hemp, on the other hand, naturally has a very high amount of CBD in most instances and only a trace amount of THC. Fortunately, the cannabinoid profile of hemp is ideal for people looking for benefits from cannabis without the ‘high.’ Hemp is used for making herbal supplements, food, fiber, rope, paper, bricks, oil, natural plastic, and so much more, whereas marijuana is usually used just recreationally, spiritually, and medicinally. The term cannabis oil can refer to either a marijuana or hemp derived oil since marijuana and hemp are two different forms of cannabis.

In the USA the legal definition of “industrial hemp,” per Section 7606 of the Agricultural Appropriations Act of 2014, is “INDUSTRIAL HEMP — The term ‘‘industrial hemp’’ means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.”

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Can CBD Oil Help My Anxiety?

According to the Mental Health Blog

How CBD Oil Treats Anxiety (Mechanisms of Action)

Cannabidiol offers a novel pharmacodynamic profile as an anxiolytic agent.  It is believed that administration of CBD (cannabidiol) modulates neurotransmission in a multitude of ways.  Literature shows that cannabidiol alters 5-HT1A, GPR55, CB1/CB2, and mu/delta opioid receptor sites – while simultaneously enhances hippocampal neurogenesis.  The combination of these neurophysiological effects likely contributes to its efficacy as a novel anxiolytic.

5-HT1A partial agonist: Modulation of neurotransmission at the 5-HT1A receptor is understood to provide anxiolytic, antidepressant, and neuroprotective effects.  Research has demonstrated the effect of cannabidiol as a 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist, meaning it binds to the receptor site but only stimulates the receptor partially (relative to a full agonist).  Studies with cloned human cell cultures note that cannabidiol displaces 5-HT1A agonists from 5-HT1A receptor sites in a dose-dependent manner.

In other words, the greater the amount of CBD oil administered following administration of a 5-HT1A agonist, the more significant the displacement.  Researchers mention that this mechanism differs from THC which is incapable of displacing 5-HT1A agonists from the 5-HT1A receptor.  Partial agonism of the 5-HT1A receptor site is associated with an array of therapeutic effects including increased serotonin (or serotonergic effects), increased dopamine (in medial PFC, striatum, hippocampus), releasing acetylcholine, and hippocampal neurogenesis.

A study published in 2008 indicated that CBD injections into the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray area of rats reduced anxiety via 5-HT1A receptor interaction.  Researchers noted that the 5-HT1A receptors were more involved than cannabinoid receptors (e.g. CB1) in reducing anxiety.  The study concluded that cannabidiol interacts directly with 5-HT1A receptors to yield an anxiolytic response.

Although the 5-HT1A partial agonism exerted by CBD may not be an outright cure for anxiety, it is likely to help many individuals.  Studies conducted on humans with panic disorder note impairments in 5-HT1A receptor function and poor 5-HT1A binding.  The bottom line is that individuals with anxiety could have dysfunctional 5-HT1A activation and may resort to commercialized 5-HT1A partial agonists (e.g. Buspar) as treatments.

  • Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16258853
  • Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15906386
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14736842
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1346719
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18446323

Hippocampal neurogenesis: One hypothesized mechanism by which pharmaceutical anxiolytics may decrease anxiety is via hippocampal neurogenesis – or growth of new neurons within the hippocampus.  It appears as though cannabidiol administration induces hippocampal neurogenesis in animal models, and for this reason, similar outcomes may occur in humans.  A rat study involving the chronic administration of 5-HT1A partial agonist (tandospirone) increases the biomarker of doublecortin – indicating the emergence of new neurons in the hippocampus.

Some researchers believe that hippocampal neurogenesis may play a critical role in attenuating symptoms of severe anxiety and/or depression.  Although not all 5-HT1A partial agonists may induce hippocampal neurogenesis, there’s evidence to suggest that cannabidiol does.  A study published in 2013 assessed the anxiolytic effects of CBD in mice exposed to chronic stress.

Results from the study indicated that CBD administration increased neuronal proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal region.  It is also thought that CBD’s modest affinity for cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 may contribute to hippocampal neurogenesis.  Stimulation of the CB1/CB2 receptor sites upregulates endocannabinoid signaling and leads to neuronal growth.

Regardless of how CBD oil induces hippocampal neurogenesis, the growth of new brain cells may be enough to decrease anxiety.  A report published in 2015 documented that increasing adult neurogenesis (regardless of the modality) is sufficient enough to decrease anxiety.  Therefore, it could be that CBD is an effective anxiolytic predominantly through mechanisms implicated in neurogenesis.

  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23298518
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26000223
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25833129

CB1 + CB2 receptor (inverse agonist): Most evidence suggests that CBD oil has a low affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptor sites as an inverse agonist.  In other words, it binds to the CB1 and CB2 receptors but exerts the pharmacologically opposite effect to an agonist.  This differs from a CB1/CB2 antagonist which solely binds to these receptors and blocks stimulation from endocannabinoids.

It also is distinct from THC which acts as a CB1/CB2 partial agonist, thereby stimulating the receptor sites.  If it acted the same as THC at the CB1/CB2 receptor sites, its therapeutic potential may be reduced.  Moreover, since cannabidiol acts as an inverse agonist at the CB1/CB2 receptor sites, it doesn’t induce psychological euphoria and/or pleasure associated with a downstream dopaminergic enhancement in the mesolimbic pathway (resulting from CB1/CB2 agonist).

Research has shown that administration of cannabidiol actually inhibits agonist effects at the CB1/CB2 receptor sites.  Although the effects of CB1 inverse agonist aren’t fully elucidated, many speculate that CB2 inverse agonist may contribute to cannabidiol’s anti-inflammatory effects.  Due to the fact that neuroinflammation is associated with anxiety disorders, we could hypothesize that a decrease in inflammation may yield anxiolytic responses in a subset of CBD users.

  • Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17245363/
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22814704

Opioid receptor modulator: Another possible mechanism by which CBD may alleviate symptoms of anxiety is through allosteric modulation of mu-opioid receptor (MOR) and delta-opioid receptor (DOR) sites.  Though it is known that allosteric modulation of the MOR and DOR is capable of reducing anxiety, it isn’t fully understood how.  Some speculate that MOR and DOR sites affect GABAergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission.

Certain individuals may be more prone to anxiety than others as a result of mu-opioid receptor expression and/or activation.  Research indicates that mu-opioid receptors participate in the modulation of anxiety based on the specific region of the brain in which they are stimulated.  What’s more, a report published in 2015 indicated that the neural circuitry associated with the DOR (delta opioid receptor) can induce OR inhibit anxiety.

Selective delta receptor agonists have been shown (in animal studies) to reduce anxiety-like behavior and block anxiogenic effects of stressors.  Specifically, modulation of the DOR in the central amygdala may predict the severity of an individual’s anxiety.  There’s reason to believe that allosteric MOR and DOR modulation provided by CBD could reduce anxiety in a subset of individuals – especially when combined with aforestated 5-HT1A and CB1/CB2 effects.

  • Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16489449
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16626794
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20730419
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25444168

Other possible mechanisms of CBD Oil for anxiety…

Although the 5-HT1A receptor partial agonism is thought to facilitate a majority of CBD’s anxiolytic effects – hippocampal neurogenesis, opioidergic modulation, and CB1/CB2 inverse agonism likely also contribute.  Lesser researched mechanisms of CBD that could also decrease anxiety include: FAAH inhibition, adenosine reuptake inhibition, GPR55 antagonism, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) increases, and PPAR agonism.  Of these mechanisms, inhibition of FAAH may be most significant in regards to anxiety attenuation.

  • Adenosine 2A receptor: Administration of CBD is thought to act upon the adenosine 2A receptor site, possibly contributing to its anxiolytic and anti-inflammatory effects.  Adenosine receptors are known to influence cardiovascular processes (cardiac rhythm, circulation), immune function, sleep, pain regulation, and blood flow.  The adenosine 2A receptor interacts with G proteins to alter cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate).  Dysfunction of the adenosine 2A receptor may disrupt neurotransmission of glutamate and dopamine and simultaneously cause inflammation, neurodegeneration, and possibly anxiety.
  • GPR55 antagonism: GPR55 (G-protein-coupled receptor 55) is a receptor expressed predominantly within the caudate nucleus and putamen.  It is often referenced as an atypical cannabinoid receptor due to the fact that it is activated by cannabinoids.  A study published in 2015 investigated the role of GPR55 function in anxiety.  Researchers concluded that GPR55 may modulate anxiety-related behaviors in rats.  In the study, it was discovered that GPR55 antagonists lead to increased anxiety.  Cannabidiol is thought to act as a GPR55 antagonist which may improve bone health and decrease proliferation of cancer cells – but may not help anxiety.
  • FAAH inhibitor: The anxiolytic efficacy of CBD may be a result of its ability to act as an enzymatic inhibitor of FAAH (fatty acid amide hydroxylase).  FAAH is an enzyme responsible for metabolizing endocannabinoids such as anandamide, but when inhibited, these endocannabinoid concentrations are increased.  Increased concentrations of endocannabinoids such as anandamide and 2-AG, both of which bind to peripheral CB1/CB2 receptor sites.
  • PPAR agonism: Agonism of PPARs (peroxisome proliferator activated receptors) may have a variety of benefits including anticancer, neuroprotective (via removal of beta-amyloid plaques), and antipsychotic effects.  Cannabidiol bolsters PPAR-alpha signaling and simultaneously decreases inflammation.  Although PPAR agonism may not directly foster an anxiolytic effect, it cannot be ruled out as a potential synergistic contributor.
  • TRPV1 receptor: The TRPV1 (transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1) receptor is a “vanilloid receptor” associated mostly with the modulation of body temperature and nociception.  Cannabidiol is believed to act as a TRPV1 receptor agonist, thereby stimulating the receptor which may reduce sensations of pain and lower inflammation.  It is possible that the nociceptive effect associated with TRPV1 agonist also reduces anxiety.
  • Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23108553
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25175973
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15219815
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26360704
  • Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25620584

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Detox: How to Know if It’s Needed and Simple Ways to Do It

by Deanna Minich, PhD, CNS, IFMCP

You’ve likely seen, or heard, the detox debate. Experts, celebrities, and news outlets have reported the importance of detoxing or doing a cleanse. Over time, it’s thought that an accumulation of environmental toxins weighs us down, saps our energy, and prevents us from living our best lives. As a result, the best way to reduce the “toxin burden” is to bring in everyday strategies to remove them and to have dedicated times of year to do a bit more for a whole-self reset.

Of course, there’s also the school of thought that suggests that our bodies are built for detoxing, and we don’t need a special diet or product to clear out the system. Detox is just a waste of time, they say. Well, there is no doubt that the body does regular cleansing through breathing, urinating, defecating, crying, secreting, and exfoliating, but are we always doing it efficiently?

With all the current data on pharmacogenetics and even nutrigenomics, we now know that every individual is different when it comes to the efficiency of toxin removal. So how would you know if you are one of the “chosen ones” who needs a detox? Let’s look at the body systems from physical, emotional, and mental perspectives, as they may provide the clues.

Physical detox

Let’s begin by looking at what “detox” means. Over the last two decades, this word has taken on a much more dynamic meaning. In the United States, we encounter over 80,000 different chemicals,1 and an estimated 4 billion pounds of chemical pollutants from plastics, pesticides, solvents, heavy metals, etc. enter into our environment, finding their way into the air, soil, food, water supplies, our clothing, and eventually, into our bodies.2 Every year, the toxic load continues to increase. Scientists now estimate that everyone of us carries at least 700 contaminants within our bodies!3

While it is true that the human body is well-equipped to rid itself of these potentially harmful chemicals, the sheer volume of what we’re now exposed to can overburden our natural detoxification processes and allow the toxins to accumulate in our tissues.

One of the first indicators that we may be harboring a toxic burden is to look at changes in the body’s immune system, such as increased susceptibility to colds, flus, and becoming sick.4 Additionally, generalized joint and muscle aches and pains, food, environmental or chemical sensitivities, headache, lethargy, weakness, and even abdominal pain could be signs that you need to help your body relieve some of the accumulated toxins.

Emotional detox

When we look at detoxification, we don’t just want to look at the removal of physical toxins that weigh down our bodies. We can also be burdened in other areas of life, including emotional and mental aspects that can arise from many areas in life—from the company we keep5 to physical and psychological stressors to sleep habits.

Mental detox

In addition to emotional toxicity, we may also experience mental toxins. Perhaps the most pervasive are the limiting thoughts that invade our minds throughout the day like, “Nobody cares what I think,” “I’m just not good at new things,” or “I can’t say no.” Years ago, I heard we have up to 80,000 thoughts each day, and most of them are negative. Regardless of the exact number, it’s probably reasonable to think that most people are not thinking positively most of the time. These types of mental toxins could add up to mental stress, leading to an inability to concentrate and even sleep. And, without proper sleep,6 we may not be allowing for the flux of toxins out of the brain.

Steps for daily detox

No matter where the toxic burden originates from, there are simple steps to take to help your body detox.

  • Be good to the gut: A gut that’s in good shape can easily excrete toxins. Give it 30 to 35 grams of fiber per day from the spectrum of plant foods, including beans and legumes, fruits, seeds, nuts, and nonstarchy, colorful vegetables.
  • Let go of limiting thoughts: Identify and release outdated emotions to relieve excess stress. Try journaling, using deep breathing to encourage the release of toxic thoughts and emotions and begin replacing old thoughts with new, expansive, positive, and empowering affirmations.
  • Fill up on fluids: Adequate water is an imperative for so many bodily processes, including detoxication.
  • Go ahead and cry: Don’t hold back the tears! A study found that those who are “easily brought to tears” have a better immune and neuroendocrine system response.7
  • Support the liver: The liver is known for its prominent role in detoxification. Liver health can be supported by consuming high-quality hypoallergenic proteins (such as rice protein), green tea, and cruciferous vegetables.8
  • Face your emotions: Many of us have been taught to suppress emotions, especially anger. Yet anger can be thought of simply as “a call to act.” Learning to develop better boundaries or finding healthy, less volatile ways to vent anger can relieve emotional toxicities.

When looking at the abundance of toxins in our environments—physical, emotional, and mental—it can be easy to feel overwhelmed. Yet you do have more control than you may realize. Work with a Functional Medicine-oriented healthcare professional to help you discover additional ways to optimize your body’s natural ability to detox.

 

References:

  1. National Resources Defense Council. https://www.nrdc.org/issues/toxic-chemicals. Accessed October 17, 2018.
  2. http://scorecard.goodguide.com/env-releases/us-map.tcl. Accessed November 5, 2018.
  3. Onstot J et al. Characterization of HRGC/MSUnidentified Peaks from the Analysis of Human Adipose Tissue. Volume 1: Technical Approach. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Toxic Substances; 1987.
  4. Sears ME et al. J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:356798.
  5. J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:356798.
  6. Inoué S. Behav Brain Res. 1995;69(1-2):91-96.
  7. Ishii H et al. http://www.clinexprheumatol.org/article.asp?a=2136. Accessed 10/17/18.
  8. Guan Y et al. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015:824185.

 

The post Detox: How to Know if It’s Needed and Simple Ways to Do It appeared first on House of Harmony.

Harmony Professional Spotlight

The purpose of this blog is two-fold. I’m going to be raising awareness about acupuncture and wellness through the description of some of the herbs and formulas that are effective for just about everything you can think of. I will also be describing techniques used in acupuncture and points that are used and why they are effective. I am 70% done with an accelerated 5 year program condensed to 3 ½ years. I am really excited about this program, oriental medicine, and to be a part of the Sanctuary Center.

I have been an ICU nurse for 22 years and I love it. I really do love the controlled chaos and being able to help people makes me really happy.  My very wise mother started pushing me to think about what the next thing I wanted to do right out of nursing school. At the time, I had a very young son, in fact, I had done my education for nursing while he was an infant. I really didn’t want to miss out on more of the short time I had with him. I promised her I would go back to school when he no longer needed me to be so present in his life, so I waited until he was a young man to decide what my next career choice would be.

I struggled with what to do next. I had a lot of choices, lateral moves, upward moves, or choose something completely different. I just couldn’t see myself going to something completely different, taking a desk job somewhere, working corporate or developing a “business” mindset. However, I was burned out. I was saddened by the realization that the western medicine, insurance companies and big pharma weren’t really effective in making people well. They had a lot of incentive to keep people sick and I just wasn’t sure that I wanted to remain a part of the (un) wellness system by obtaining an advanced degree in nursing to hold more responsibility for other’s health and well-being with inadequate tools.

I started  thinking about the interconnectedness of things, the length of time people had been around, the shamans and healers that were around before the advent of our modern medical system and how people had become sick since the beginning of time. As I was processing all of the choices I had with Patty, during one of our sessions, she drops me a text with a link to East West College of Natural Medicine’s website. I was intimidated and terrified. I knew I wanted something in health care and this was health care.

 

 

Dr. Harmony’s Resource Corner

Sexual Assault in the United States

  • One in five women and one in 71 men will be raped at some point in their lives (a)
  • In the U.S., one in three women and one in six men experienced some form of contact sexual violence in their lifetime (o)
  • 51.1% of female victims of rape reported being raped by an intimate partner and 40.8% by an acquaintance (a)
  • 52.4% of male victims report being raped by an acquaintance and 15.1% by a stranger (a)
  • Almost half (49.5%) of multiracial women and over 45% of American Indian/Alaska Native women were subjected to some form of contact sexual violence in their lifetime (o)
  • 91% of victims of rape and sexual assault are female, and nine percent are male (m)
  • In eight out of 10 cases of rape, the victim knew the perpetrator (j)
  • Eight percent of rapes occur while the victim is at work (c)

Cost & Impact of Sexual Assault

  • The lifetime cost of rape per victim is $122,461 (n)
  • Annually, rape costs the U.S. more than any other crime ($127 billion), followed by assault ($93 billion), murder ($71 billion), and drunk driving, including fatalities ($61 billion) (j)
  • 81% of women and 35% of men report significant short- or long-term impacts such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (a)
  • Health care is 16% higher for women who were sexually abused as children and 36% higher for women who were physically and sexually abused as children (k)

Child Sexual Abuse

  • One in four girls and one in six boys will be sexually abused before they turn 18 years old (d)
  • 30% of women were between the ages of 11 and 17 at the time of their first completed rape (a)
  • 12.3% of women were age 10 or younger at the time of their first completed rape victimization (a)
  • 27.8% of men were age 10 or younger at the time of their first completed rape victimization (a)
  • More than one third of women who report being raped before age 18 also experience rape as an adult (a)
  • 96% of people who sexually abuse children are male, and 76.8% of people who sexually abuse children are adults (l)
  • 34% of people who sexually abuse a child are family members of the child (l)
  • It is estimated that 325,000 children per year are currently at risk of becoming victims of commercial child sexual exploitation (k)
  • The average age at which girls first become victims of prostitution is 12-14 years old, and the average age at which boys first become victims of prostitution is 11-13 years old (k)
  • Only 12% of child sexual abuse is ever reported to the authorities (f)

Campus Sexual Assault

  • 20% – 25% of college women and 15% of college men are victims of forced sex during their time in college (b)
  • A 2002 study revealed that 63.3% of men at one university who self-reported acts qualifying as rape or attempted rape admitted to committing repeat rapes (h)
  • More than 90% of sexual assault victims on college campuses do not report the assault (b)
  • 27% of college women have experienced some form of unwanted sexual contact (e)
  • Nearly two thirds of college students experience sexual harassment (p)

Crime Reports

  • Rape is the most under-reported crime; 63% of sexual assaults are not reported to police (m)
  • The prevalence of false reporting is low — between 2% and 10%. For example, a study of eight U.S. communities, which included 2,059 cases of sexual assault, found a 7.1% rate of false reports (i). A study of 136 sexual assault cases in Boston found a 5.9% rate of false reports (h). Researchers studied 812 reports of sexual assault from 2000-2003 and found a 2.1% rate of false reports (g).

References

(a) Black, M. C., Basile, K. C., Breiding, M. J., Smith, S .G., Walters, M. L., Merrick, M. T., Stevens, M. R. (2011). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 summary report. Retrieved from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/pdf/NISVS_Report2010-a.pdf

(b) Cullen, F., Fisher, B., & Turner, M., The sexual victimization of college women (NCJ 182369). (2000). Retrieved from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/182369.pdf

(c) Duhart, D. (2001). Violence in the Workplace, 1993-99. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Available at https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/vw99.pdf

(d) Finkelhor, D., Hotaling, G., Lewis, I. A., & Smith, C. (1990). Sexual abuse in a national survey of adult men and women: Prevalence, characteristics and risk factors. Child Abuse & Neglect 14, 19-28. doi:10.1016/0145-2134(90)90077-7

(e) Gross, A. M., Winslett, A., Roberts, M., & Gohm, C. L. (2006). An Examination of Sexual Violence Against College Women. Violence Against Women, 12, 288-300. doi: 10.1177/1077801205277358

(f) Hanson, R. F., Resnick, H. S., Saunders, B. E., Kilpatrick, D. G., & Best, C. (1999). Factors related to the reporting of childhood rape. Child Abuse and Neglect, 23(6), 559–569.

(g) Heenan, M., & Murray, S. (2006). Study of reported rapes in Victoria 2000-2003: Summary research report. Retrieved from the State of Victoria (Australia), Department of Human Services: http://mams.rmit.edu.au/igzd08ddxtpwz.pdf

(h) Lisak, D., Gardinier, L., Nicksa, S. C., & Cote, A. M. (2010). False allegations of sexual assault: An analysis of ten years of reported cases. Violence Against Women, 16, 1318-1334. doi:10.1177/1077801210387747

(i) Lonsway, K. A., Archambault, J., & Lisak, D. (2009). False reports: Moving beyond the issue to successfully investigate and prosecute non-stranger sexual assault. The Voice, 3(1), 1-11. Retrieved from the National District Attorneys Association: http://www.ndaa.org/pdf/the_voice_vol_3_no_1_2009.pdf

(j) Miller, T. R., Cohen, M. A., & Wiersema, B. (1996). Victim costs and consequences: A new look (NCJ 155282). Retrieved from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/victcost.pdf

(k) National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation. (2012). National Plan to Prevent the Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children. Retrieved from http://www.preventtogether.org/Resources/Documents/NationalPlan2012FINAL.pdf

(l) National Sexual Violence Resource Center. (2011). Child sexual abuse prevention: Overview. Retrieved from http://www.nsvrc.org/sites/default/files/Publications_NSVRC_Overview_Child-sexual-abuse-prevention_0.pdf

(m) Rennison, C. M. (2002). Rape and sexual assault: Reporting to police and medical attention, 1992-2000 [NCJ 194530]. Retrieved from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics: https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/rsarp00.pdf

(n) Peterson, C., DeGue, S., Florence, C., & Lokey, C. N. (2017). Lifetime economic burden of rape among U.S. adults. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Advanced online publication. doi:10.1016/j. amepre.2016.11.014

(o) Smith, S. G., Chen, J., Basile, K. C., Gilbert, L. K., Merrick, M. T., Patel, N., … Jain, A. (2017). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010-2012 state report. Retrieved from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/NISVS-StateReportBook.pdf

(p) Hill, C., & Silva, E. (2005). Drawing the line: Sexual harassment on campus. Retrieved from the American Association of University Women: http://www.aauw.org/files/2013/02/drawing-the-line-sexual-harassment-on-campus.pdf

 

Resources

https://centers.rainn.org/

http://www.pandys.org/crisissupport.html

https://victimsofcrime.org/help-for-crime-victims/national-hotlines-and-helpful-links

http://www.itv.com/thismorning/rape-helplines

http://www.joyfulheartfoundation.org/learn/sexual-assault-and-rape/resources/hotlines-and-more-information

http://www.supportline.org.uk/problems/rape_sexual-assault.php

http://rapecrisis.org.uk/helplinesemotionalsupport.php

http://rapecrisis.org.uk/

http://www.lifecentre.uk.com/helpline/lead_helpline.html

http://www.drcc.ie/get-help-and-information/helpline/

 

*Information from RAINN.ORG

 

The post Dr. Harmony’s Resource Corner appeared first on House of Harmony.

Dr. Harmony’s Resource Corner

Sexual Assault in the United States

  • One in five women and one in 71 men will be raped at some point in their lives (a)
  • In the U.S., one in three women and one in six men experienced some form of contact sexual violence in their lifetime (o)
  • 51.1% of female victims of rape reported being raped by an intimate partner and 40.8% by an acquaintance (a)
  • 52.4% of male victims report being raped by an acquaintance and 15.1% by a stranger (a)
  • Almost half (49.5%) of multiracial women and over 45% of American Indian/Alaska Native women were subjected to some form of contact sexual violence in their lifetime (o)
  • 91% of victims of rape and sexual assault are female, and nine percent are male (m)
  • In eight out of 10 cases of rape, the victim knew the perpetrator (j)
  • Eight percent of rapes occur while the victim is at work (c)

Cost & Impact of Sexual Assault

  • The lifetime cost of rape per victim is $122,461 (n)
  • Annually, rape costs the U.S. more than any other crime ($127 billion), followed by assault ($93 billion), murder ($71 billion), and drunk driving, including fatalities ($61 billion) (j)
  • 81% of women and 35% of men report significant short- or long-term impacts such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (a)
  • Health care is 16% higher for women who were sexually abused as children and 36% higher for women who were physically and sexually abused as children (k)

Child Sexual Abuse

  • One in four girls and one in six boys will be sexually abused before they turn 18 years old (d)
  • 30% of women were between the ages of 11 and 17 at the time of their first completed rape (a)
  • 12.3% of women were age 10 or younger at the time of their first completed rape victimization (a)
  • 27.8% of men were age 10 or younger at the time of their first completed rape victimization (a)
  • More than one third of women who report being raped before age 18 also experience rape as an adult (a)
  • 96% of people who sexually abuse children are male, and 76.8% of people who sexually abuse children are adults (l)
  • 34% of people who sexually abuse a child are family members of the child (l)
  • It is estimated that 325,000 children per year are currently at risk of becoming victims of commercial child sexual exploitation (k)
  • The average age at which girls first become victims of prostitution is 12-14 years old, and the average age at which boys first become victims of prostitution is 11-13 years old (k)
  • Only 12% of child sexual abuse is ever reported to the authorities (f)

Campus Sexual Assault

  • 20% – 25% of college women and 15% of college men are victims of forced sex during their time in college (b)
  • A 2002 study revealed that 63.3% of men at one university who self-reported acts qualifying as rape or attempted rape admitted to committing repeat rapes (h)
  • More than 90% of sexual assault victims on college campuses do not report the assault (b)
  • 27% of college women have experienced some form of unwanted sexual contact (e)
  • Nearly two thirds of college students experience sexual harassment (p)

Crime Reports

  • Rape is the most under-reported crime; 63% of sexual assaults are not reported to police (m)
  • The prevalence of false reporting is low — between 2% and 10%. For example, a study of eight U.S. communities, which included 2,059 cases of sexual assault, found a 7.1% rate of false reports (i). A study of 136 sexual assault cases in Boston found a 5.9% rate of false reports (h). Researchers studied 812 reports of sexual assault from 2000-2003 and found a 2.1% rate of false reports (g).

References

(a) Black, M. C., Basile, K. C., Breiding, M. J., Smith, S .G., Walters, M. L., Merrick, M. T., Stevens, M. R. (2011). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 summary report. Retrieved from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/pdf/NISVS_Report2010-a.pdf

(b) Cullen, F., Fisher, B., & Turner, M., The sexual victimization of college women (NCJ 182369). (2000). Retrieved from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/182369.pdf

(c) Duhart, D. (2001). Violence in the Workplace, 1993-99. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Available at https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/vw99.pdf

(d) Finkelhor, D., Hotaling, G., Lewis, I. A., & Smith, C. (1990). Sexual abuse in a national survey of adult men and women: Prevalence, characteristics and risk factors. Child Abuse & Neglect 14, 19-28. doi:10.1016/0145-2134(90)90077-7

(e) Gross, A. M., Winslett, A., Roberts, M., & Gohm, C. L. (2006). An Examination of Sexual Violence Against College Women. Violence Against Women, 12, 288-300. doi: 10.1177/1077801205277358

(f) Hanson, R. F., Resnick, H. S., Saunders, B. E., Kilpatrick, D. G., & Best, C. (1999). Factors related to the reporting of childhood rape. Child Abuse and Neglect, 23(6), 559–569.

(g) Heenan, M., & Murray, S. (2006). Study of reported rapes in Victoria 2000-2003: Summary research report. Retrieved from the State of Victoria (Australia), Department of Human Services: http://mams.rmit.edu.au/igzd08ddxtpwz.pdf

(h) Lisak, D., Gardinier, L., Nicksa, S. C., & Cote, A. M. (2010). False allegations of sexual assault: An analysis of ten years of reported cases. Violence Against Women, 16, 1318-1334. doi:10.1177/1077801210387747

(i) Lonsway, K. A., Archambault, J., & Lisak, D. (2009). False reports: Moving beyond the issue to successfully investigate and prosecute non-stranger sexual assault. The Voice, 3(1), 1-11. Retrieved from the National District Attorneys Association: http://www.ndaa.org/pdf/the_voice_vol_3_no_1_2009.pdf

(j) Miller, T. R., Cohen, M. A., & Wiersema, B. (1996). Victim costs and consequences: A new look (NCJ 155282). Retrieved from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/victcost.pdf

(k) National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation. (2012). National Plan to Prevent the Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children. Retrieved from http://www.preventtogether.org/Resources/Documents/NationalPlan2012FINAL.pdf

(l) National Sexual Violence Resource Center. (2011). Child sexual abuse prevention: Overview. Retrieved from http://www.nsvrc.org/sites/default/files/Publications_NSVRC_Overview_Child-sexual-abuse-prevention_0.pdf

(m) Rennison, C. M. (2002). Rape and sexual assault: Reporting to police and medical attention, 1992-2000 [NCJ 194530]. Retrieved from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics: https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/rsarp00.pdf

(n) Peterson, C., DeGue, S., Florence, C., & Lokey, C. N. (2017). Lifetime economic burden of rape among U.S. adults. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Advanced online publication. doi:10.1016/j. amepre.2016.11.014

(o) Smith, S. G., Chen, J., Basile, K. C., Gilbert, L. K., Merrick, M. T., Patel, N., … Jain, A. (2017). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010-2012 state report. Retrieved from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/NISVS-StateReportBook.pdf

(p) Hill, C., & Silva, E. (2005). Drawing the line: Sexual harassment on campus. Retrieved from the American Association of University Women: http://www.aauw.org/files/2013/02/drawing-the-line-sexual-harassment-on-campus.pdf

 

Resources

https://centers.rainn.org/

http://www.pandys.org/crisissupport.html

https://victimsofcrime.org/help-for-crime-victims/national-hotlines-and-helpful-links

http://www.itv.com/thismorning/rape-helplines

http://www.joyfulheartfoundation.org/learn/sexual-assault-and-rape/resources/hotlines-and-more-information

http://www.supportline.org.uk/problems/rape_sexual-assault.php

http://rapecrisis.org.uk/helplinesemotionalsupport.php

http://rapecrisis.org.uk/

http://www.lifecentre.uk.com/helpline/lead_helpline.html

http://www.drcc.ie/get-help-and-information/helpline/

 

*Information from RAINN.ORG

 

The post Dr. Harmony’s Resource Corner appeared first on House of Harmony.

Self Soothing Tip #1

The Science behind Weighted Blanket Benefits

Weighted blankets have been used in the scientific health and occupational therapy space for over a decade. Studies published in peer-reviewed journals date back to 2008 from a wide range of researchers: neuroscience, bio-engineering, physiology, behavioral health and occupational therapy. The findings are very promising and speak to the efficacy of a weighted blanket.

The basic premise behind weighted blankets is the power of Deep Pressure Touch Stimulation. “Deep pressure touch helps the body relax. Like a firm hug, weighted blankets help us feel secure, grounded and safe*.” Besides feeling comforted and relaxed, the following benefits have been scientifically shown in most studies done with weighted blankets:

  • Naturally increase levels of relaxation with Serotonin and Melatonin release
  • Help reduce stress and anxiety levels by lowering Cortisol levels
  • Minimize fidgeting, anxiousness and other ADHD effects
  • Sleep longer and better with a “warm hug” feeling
  • Reduce symptoms of other sensory and sleep disorders including Insomnia, Anxiety,
  • Panic attacks, Autism, Restless leg syndrome and others.

*(Psychology Today) Link: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/minding-the-body/201112/choosing-blanket-help-you-sleep

Dr. Harmony Recommended Products

Mosaic 728x90

10 Ways to Deal with Stress Over the Holidays

When you think of the holidays, what comes to mind? Some might say giving thanks, while others cite time spent with family, enjoying festivities, and holiday food.

For many people, an unwelcome guest may also appear: stress. By being proactive, however, you can reap the benefits of the holidays and address the things that trigger anxiety and apprehension. The following are 10 ways to cope with possible tensions during the holiday season:

  1. Avoid overextending yourself.
    • Does the idea of hosting holiday gatherings exhaust you? You may feel obligated to invite your loved ones for Thanksgiving dinner, a cookie exchange in December, or other holiday-related activities that seem to increase expectations and levels of personal stress.
    • Remember, though, you don’t have to do it all. Tell your friends and family you feel overcommitted and ask them to take over some of the hosting duties. And if you still feel like hosting but want to lighten your load, request that each guest bring a dish or contribute in another way. Don’t be afraid to ask for help.
  1. Prepare a budget for holiday gifts.
    • Research reveals that people who experience a spike in stress levels over the holidays are more likely to worry about the amount of money that may be involved.1 From maxing out credit cards to falling behind on bills, consumers experience a great deal of stress relating to the real, or projected, financial burdens of holiday gifts and gift-giving.
    • This is where budgeting comes in. When you are holiday shopping, rather than filling your cart aimlessly, determine in advance what you can afford to spend realistically. Then make a list and figure out exactly whom you intend to gift—allocate a specific sum to each person on your list. Budgeting will allow you to take control over your holiday shopping and expenditure.
  1. Make a plan for Black Friday.
    • An effective way to control spending is to shop on Black Friday—the day after Thanksgiving. Yet this, too, can take a real toll. Some people sacrifice sleep while waiting in long lines for the stores to open, skip meals in the hope of snagging the best deals, and experience increased stress while competing for in-store deals and finding parking spaces.2
    • To reduce stress levels, make a plan of which stores you plan to visit and potentially what you plan to purchase there. Wait until the afternoon to do your Black Friday shopping. Lines are generally much shorter, and the crowds aren’t as competitive after the morning hours. Also keep in mind that some retailers offer weeklong sales, so you may want to shop on a different day. Cyber Monday, the Monday after Thanksgiving, is a compelling option for shopping as well.
  1. Take a personal day.
    • To make real progress on your to-do list, schedule specific days and times, in advance, to shop, cook, and get your home ready for guests. This is particularly true if you are employed when it may be difficult to spend several hours at a stretch on holiday tasks. You can complete certain things—say, grocery shopping—during your lunch break.
    • Or consider taking a personal day to plow through several obligations at once. Taking approved time off from work, midweek, can give you the energy boost you need to come out ahead of schedule. The feeling of being in control and accomplishment for the holidays may energize you when you get back to your desk, too.
  1. Rely on healthy fuel to stay strong.
    • Do you eat processed snacks when you experience stress? Life’s daily hassles lead to an increase in unhealthy snacking, and the holidays are no exception.3
      Rather than making this time of year a dietary free-for-all, be sure to keep healthy snacks on hand at all times. Carrots and homemade hummus are a protein-packed option; so too are Greek yogurt and fruit. Then, when you’re craving an indulgence, you can snack on whole foods, which are known to help reduce feelings of stress.4
  1. Spend time with colleagues.
    • US employees are 70% more stressed than usual over the holidays.5 If you’re feeling overwhelmed or isolated, don’t overlook the benefits of socializing with your colleagues.
    • Your coworkers are likely experiencing similar emotions to those you’re facing, so think about joining them for happy hour or a walk on a nearby trail. Socializing is highly beneficial, and spending time with colleagues can offer a much-needed escape from the holiday stress in your personal life.
  1. Take time each day to clear your mind.
    • While human beings are social, we also benefit from spending time alone. Being by ourselves allows us to recharge and reflect. In turn, relaxation activates our internal systems that help restore balance within the body, so it is important to make self-care a top priority during the holiday season.6
    • To restore your sense of calm, try to spend at least 15 minutes alone each day, doing something you enjoy. Deep breathing, listening to relaxing music, taking a bath, or even getting a massage can work wonders in the way of reducing holiday stress.
  1. Spread out visits with loved ones over the course of several days.
    • If you have a large family, you can reduce your stress by scheduling holiday visits over a number of days. Seeing relatives at various locations in a short time is not only stressful, but downright exhausting.
    • Keep in mind that you may need to schedule a visit with grandparents one day, a cousin the next, and your parents the following weekend. The same applies to other friends and family—remember that your time matters, and try not to feel guilty about your scheduling needs.
  1. Find your winter sport.
    • If you’re a runner, there are plenty of races that will help counteract your anxiety over the holidays. If Turkey Day 5Ks and Reindeer Runs aren’t your style, work to reduce your stress levels with another activity—for instance, hiking, cross-country skiing, or yoga.
    • Physical activity promotes health and happiness, and even 20 minutes on the treadmill can improve your mood. In fact, experts claim exercise is one of the most effective ways to manage stress.7 Prioritize keeping active this holiday season.
  1. Start a gratitude journal.
    • People of all ages can benefit by focusing on the positive. Expressing our gratitude in a sentence or two at the end of each day is not only a great habit to cultivate, it touches on the central theme of the holidays.
    • Research indicates that gratitude is associated with happiness and wellbeing, and as such, jotting down the things you’re grateful for can be an ideal coping mechanism.8 To cut back on stress this season, consider starting a “gratitude journal” of your own. It just might make you feel better.

The tips in this post are designed to help you manage stress over the holidays. If you find that you can’t escape your negative thoughts and feelings, consider seeking help from a doctor or mental health professional—especially if your holiday stress persists over an extended period of time.

 

References:

  1. Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research. Holiday Stress. American Psychological Association. Published December 12, 2006.
  2. Lennon Sharron J et al. Effects of emotions, sex, self-control, and public self-consciousness on Black Friday misbehavior. Journal of Global Fashion Marketing. 2017;8:3.
  3. Wouters S et al. Negative affective stress reactivity: The dampening effect of snacking. Stress and Health. 2018;34(2):286-295.
  4. Wongvibulsin Shannon. Eat Right, Drink Well, Stress Less: Stress-Reducing Foods, Herbal Supplements, and Teas. UCLA Department of Integrative Medicine. 2014.
  5. Virgin Pulse Staff. ’Tis the Season for Holiday Stress. The Holidays’ Impact On Employee Health and Happiness. Virgin Pulse. 2014.
  6. Robinson Diane. 5 Tools to Fight Holiday Stress. U.S. News Health. November 22, 2016.
  7. Hatfield Heather. 4 Stress-Busting Moves You Can Do Anytime. WebMD. August 25, 2008.
  8. Teatreault Donna. The Practice of Gratitude: Now and Beyond the Holiday Season. Harvard Graduate School of Education. December 15, 2017.

Submitted by the Metagenics Marketing Team

The post 10 Ways to Deal with Stress Over the Holidays appeared first on House of Harmony.

Holistic Psychiatry Information

Oriental Medicine

Acupuncture2Oriental Medicine is an ancient medicine that has diagnosed, healed and prevented illness in China for over 3,000 years. It is the pearl of ancient wisdom for your health and well-being and has been able to approach, assist and/or treat many health issues.

The practice of Oriental Medicine includes acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathic remedies, nutritional therapy, Tui Na (a form of therapeutic massage), cupping therapy, Gua Sha (scraping technique), moxibustion (herbal heat therapy), and Qi Gong (a form of breathing therapy). All of these methods share an equally long history of development, usage, and effectiveness in the maintenance of health, and the treatment of disease.

Acupuncture

acupuncture of earAcupuncture involves the use of hair-thin, sterile, single-use needles which are inserted into specific points on the body (legs, arms, abdomen, back, head, and etc.). The purpose of the needles is to help your body harmonize itself. Those who are afraid of needles typically change their mind once they see just how thin acupuncture needles are. However, your acupuncture physician can treat you even without the use of acupuncture needles. Your acupuncture physician may also prescribe herbal medicine, nutritional counseling, use cupping therapy, massage techniques (Tui Na), moxibustion (herbal heat therapy), or a scraping technique (Gua Sha).

MD001310Acupuncture is a highly effective health care system that has been continuously refined over the last 5,000 years and is the oldest continually practiced form of medicine in the world. This gentle, non-invasive medicine has helped millions to get well on a physical, emotional and spiritual level. The National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization both acknowledge the efficacy and effectiveness of Acupuncture for a variety of chronic health conditions. Acupuncture is used as both a preventive medicine, as well as a healing medicine to help you overcome chronic or acute health conditions.

 

How Does It Work?

Acupuncture-Therapy-_-Acupuncture-Moving-Cupping-Demo

Acupuncture and herbal medicine from the foundation of Chinese medicine, which is based on the notion of balance. To the practitioner, health is defined as the balance of yin and yang and the smooth flow of Qi (life force) and blood throughout the body.When yin and yang are out of balance, the organ systems begin to malfunction and sickness results.

Imbalance can result from many factors, including mental and emotional stress, improper diet, environmental factors, physical trauma, genetic predispositions, etc. Our number one priority is helping your body regain its balance. The first step is to conduct a thorough evaluation and determine the root of the imbalance.

 Evaluation and Diagnosis

Each patient is evaluated using four primary tools: observation, listening and smelling, questioning, and palpation. The information gathered with these tools is used to formulate an overall health picture. Examination of the tongue and monitoring of the pulse play a crucial role in diagnosis. The tongue is the mirror of the body, offering clues about the general state of harmony or disharmony in the body based on its color, moisture, size, coating and any abnormalities present.

Contemporary Chinese Pulse Diagnosis is an exquisite and sophisticated means of understanding the whole person and provides insight into your emotional conditions, traumas (emotional and physical), previous illness, constitution, environmental stressors, lifestyle, and behavioral patterns.

Patsy Evans is a Licensed Acupuncture Physician and Doctor of Oriental Medicine and specializes in Emotional Disharmony and Holistic Psychiatry.  Our holistic approach to psychiatric medicine is intended to work as a complimentary treatment to counseling and traditional western psychiatry.

The post Holistic Psychiatry Information appeared first on House of Harmony.

Holistic Psychiatry Information

Oriental Medicine

Acupuncture2Oriental Medicine is an ancient medicine that has diagnosed, healed and prevented illness in China for over 3,000 years. It is the pearl of ancient wisdom for your health and well-being and has been able to approach, assist and/or treat many health issues.

The practice of Oriental Medicine includes acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathic remedies, nutritional therapy, Tui Na (a form of therapeutic massage), cupping therapy, Gua Sha (scraping technique), moxibustion (herbal heat therapy), and Qi Gong (a form of breathing therapy). All of these methods share an equally long history of development, usage, and effectiveness in the maintenance of health, and the treatment of disease.

Acupuncture

acupuncture of earAcupuncture involves the use of hair-thin, sterile, single-use needles which are inserted into specific points on the body (legs, arms, abdomen, back, head, and etc.). The purpose of the needles is to help your body harmonize itself. Those who are afraid of needles typically change their mind once they see just how thin acupuncture needles are. However, your acupuncture physician can treat you even without the use of acupuncture needles. Your acupuncture physician may also prescribe herbal medicine, nutritional counseling, use cupping therapy, massage techniques (Tui Na), moxibustion (herbal heat therapy), or a scraping technique (Gua Sha).

MD001310Acupuncture is a highly effective health care system that has been continuously refined over the last 5,000 years and is the oldest continually practiced form of medicine in the world. This gentle, non-invasive medicine has helped millions to get well on a physical, emotional and spiritual level. The National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization both acknowledge the efficacy and effectiveness of Acupuncture for a variety of chronic health conditions. Acupuncture is used as both a preventive medicine, as well as a healing medicine to help you overcome chronic or acute health conditions.

 

How Does It Work?

Acupuncture-Therapy-_-Acupuncture-Moving-Cupping-Demo

Acupuncture and herbal medicine from the foundation of Chinese medicine, which is based on the notion of balance. To the practitioner, health is defined as the balance of yin and yang and the smooth flow of Qi (life force) and blood throughout the body.When yin and yang are out of balance, the organ systems begin to malfunction and sickness results.

Imbalance can result from many factors, including mental and emotional stress, improper diet, environmental factors, physical trauma, genetic predispositions, etc. Our number one priority is helping your body regain its balance. The first step is to conduct a thorough evaluation and determine the root of the imbalance.

 Evaluation and Diagnosis

Each patient is evaluated using four primary tools: observation, listening and smelling, questioning, and palpation. The information gathered with these tools is used to formulate an overall health picture. Examination of the tongue and monitoring of the pulse play a crucial role in diagnosis. The tongue is the mirror of the body, offering clues about the general state of harmony or disharmony in the body based on its color, moisture, size, coating and any abnormalities present.

Contemporary Chinese Pulse Diagnosis is an exquisite and sophisticated means of understanding the whole person and provides insight into your emotional conditions, traumas (emotional and physical), previous illness, constitution, environmental stressors, lifestyle, and behavioral patterns.

Patsy Evans is a Licensed Acupuncture Physician and Doctor of Oriental Medicine and specializes in Emotional Disharmony and Holistic Psychiatry.  Our holistic approach to psychiatric medicine is intended to work as a complimentary treatment to counseling and traditional western psychiatry.

The post Holistic Psychiatry Information appeared first on House of Harmony.